If you are one of the many residents in Florida who is embarking on the process of getting divorced, you may at times no doubt feel overwhelmed by all of the decisions you have to make. It is no easy task to separate lives that have become so intertwined. At the same time as you are faced with decisions about where you will live and how you will split up your marital assets and debts, you may feel concerned about how to protect yourself going forward. 

It is common for spouses to name each other as the executor of their will. If you have done this, you might instinctively think now is the time for you to change that. However, Forbes cautions against doing this before your divorce decree has been finalized. You will not know what assets you will have until this happens, making it important to wait to make this type of change. 

When it comes to a documents that provide another person the ability to manage your health care decisions or finances should an emergency, like an accident, occur and render you unable to do so, you can create or update those as soon as you and your spouse separate. This is advisable as you likely do not want your estranged spouse managing these things on your behalf. 

This information is not intended to provide legal advice but is instead meant to give people in Florida an idea of when they may or may not be able to update things like a will, trust, power of attorney or advanced health care directive during or after they get a divorce.