As you and your beloved set about planning your Florida wedding, the last thing you want to thing about is the possibility that your marriage ultimately will end in divorce. Unfortunately, however, the American divorce rate has hovered around 50% for several decades now. Consequently, addressing that possibility now, however unpleasant it may seem at first blush, by means of a prenuptial agreement may well save you considerable heartache and distress in the future.

FindLaw explains that rather than indicating that you and your beloved do not trust each other, a prenup instead means that both of you are financially responsible adults who seek to protect yourselves and each other in the future.

Typical prenup provisions

Keep in mind that your prenuptial agreement can only address financial issues, not personal ones. Typical prenups include such things as the following:

  • A list of the assets and properties each of you now owns
  • A provision that each of you will retain these assets and properties as your separate property in the event of a divorce
  • A provision as to how the two of you intend to divide marital property and debts in the event of a divorce
  • A provision as to how the two of you intend to divide any retirement accounts you have now or in the future in the event of a divorce
  • If either or both of you already have children, how you intend to provide for them during the marriage and in the event of a divorce

Finally, if one or both of you owns a business, or if the two of you have gone or intend to go into business together, your prenuptial agreement should include a provision as to how you intend to divide that business in the event of a divorce.

This is general educational information and not intended to provide legal advice.